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October 13, 2017

President Signs Executive Order Designed to Change ACA Rules

On Oct. 12, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order intended to change certain rules under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The order would relax regulations on association health plans. This change could allow individuals and small businesses to purchase health insurance policies across state lines and avoid certain ACA requirements. The executive order also directs the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and the Treasury (Departments) to consider expanding the availability of low-cost short-term, limited-duration insurance and health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs).
June 14, 2017

DOL Withdraws Worker Classification Guidance

On June 7, 2017, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) withdrew a 2015 administrative interpretation on classifying workers as employees or independent contractors. The withdrawal became effective immediately. Despite the withdrawal of this guidance, employers are still required to properly classify their workers. The DOL stated that it “will continue to fully and fairly enforce all laws within its jurisdiction, including the Fair Labor Standards Act.”
May 1, 2017

Working Interviews and Alternatives

Few things are more frustrating for employers than finding out that a new hire oversold their knowledge, skills, and abilities. The employee looked great on paper and appeared confident and competent in the interview, but when it came to doing the basic duties of the job, they just didn’t have what it took. To lessen the likelihood of this unfortunate situation, some employers want to see the candidate in action before formally hiring them. They’ll invite the candidate to spend a day or so at the workplace, shadowing a seasoned employee or doing some of the tasks of the job. This is known as a working interview. It’s legal to conduct working interviews, but there are serious drawbacks and risks to understand and consider. Consequently, they are not recommended. However, if you do conduct them, here are some issues to be aware of...
February 20, 2017

DOL Overtime Rule: Update

The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) overtime rule is unlikely to come to fruition. The rule—which was scheduled to take effect Dec. 1, 2016—was delayed by federal court injunction on Nov. 22, 2016. In December, the DOL filed for an expedited appeal of the court injunction.
February 17, 2017

5 Important HR Issues to Monitor in 2017

New administrations bring new challenges to the professional realm, and the Trump administration is no exception. Many of the former administration’s health care initiatives are being rolled back or halted. This leaves employers in an uncertain place in regard to compliance regulations and reform laws. This uncertainty comes in addition to the already complicated day-to-day tasks of an organization, leaving many feeling vulnerable.
November 28, 2016

New Overtime Rule will not Take Effect on Dec. 1 as Scheduled

On Nov. 22, 2016, a federal judge in Texas issued a preliminary injunction, halting the enforcement of the Department of Labor’s (DOL) new overtime rule until further notice. The rule, which was set to take effect on Dec. 1, 2016, would have increased the salary threshold for the “white collar overtime exemptions" to $47,476 per year. The judge’s ruling gives employers across the country a reprieve from having to raise salaries for exempt employees to the new threshold or pay them overtime. However, an appeal of the ruling is possible. The DOL said in a statement that it was reviewing the court's order and considering any next steps.
November 23, 2016

Overtime Rule Blocked by Federal Court

On Nov. 22, 2016, a federal judge in Texas issued a preliminary injunction, halting the enforcement of the Department of Labor’s (DOL) new overtime rule until further notice. The rule, which was set to take effect on Dec. 1, 2016, would have increased the salary threshold for the “white collar overtime exemptions" to $47,476 per year.